Nature Word of the Month – March 2017

Nature Word of the Month - March 2017: MARCESCENT

Have you noticed that some trees seem to hold on to their leaves throughout the winter?  We often notice how the golden and coppery colors stand out among the surrounding bare trees or against the backdrop of green conifers.  It’s common especially for oaks, American Beech and Witch Hazels.

Now is the perfect time to take notice of which trees and shrubs still have dried leaves or flower corollas clinging on, before the new spring growth casts them off. And because there are a limited variety with this trait, these trees should be fairly easy to identify.

Next time you are out, take notice of the trees and have fun pointing out any marcescent ones you see.

Fondly,
Monique

Delightful Nature Crafts & Activities for Valentine’s Day

Delightful Nature Crafts & Activities for Valentine's Day

OBSERVE

Look for hearts in nature: You might be surprised where you may see naturally occurring heart shapes – a patch of lichen, a rock, a hollow in a tree.  Keep a lookout for them whenever you are out.  You never know where nature hearts will reveal themselves.

PLAN

Creating a Bird-Feeding Haven | Green Acorns

Show your nature love by creating a wild-life friendly habitat.  These are great projects for your own yard or a local school/community garden:

MAKE

Leave some nature love notes: Linda shares a simple Valentine activity that encourages children to get out and notice nature.  They will be connecting with the nature around them as they create lovely heart land art.

Bring it inside: Make some nature hearts to hang around the house.

Pine cone fairies:  Spread the love with these adorable fairies.  There are nice examples and tutorials here and here.

Cupid’s arrows: These arrows could also be made with leaves instead of feathers and bits of bark for the tips.  Get creative with whatever natural materials are on hand.

Do

DIY heart bird feeder

February is National Bird-Feeding month.  Show your fondness for your feathered friends by making some hanging bird treats and learning more about common backyard birds.  This is a wonderful resource.

The Great Backyard Bird Count begins February 17th.  Consider participating in this citizen science activity and help researchers “learn more about how birds are doing and how to protect them and the environment we share”.

I hope some of these nature Valentine’s ideas spark your interest and that you’ll enjoy trying some of them out.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Fondly,
Monique

Nature Word of the Month: SUBNIVEAN

Last winter, after warmer temperatures had melted the top layer of snow, we noticed a network of tunnels throughout our yard.  We soon realized that they were created by either mice or moles.  It was a fun discovery!

A couple of months ago my husband started reading Winter World: The Ingenuity of Animal Survival by Bernd Heinrich to our children.  He got to a section that talked about the subnivean zone and the kids realized that the tunnels we had seen were evidence of subnivean life.   My husband was fascinated and suggested that I use it as one of my nature words of the month.  Well, this is the perfect month.  I hope you enjoy exploring the subnivean zone!

Nature Word of the Month: SUBNIVEAN | via Green Acorns

Learn More

  • Northern Woodlands has a great article about these shelters in the snow.
  • This article by the National Wildlife Federation is very helpful and has a nice graphic.

Resources to Inspire

Fondly,

Monique

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NOTICING NATURE : Nature prompts for January 2017

Noticing Nature - Nature Prompts for Children and Their Families: January 2017 via Green Acorns

It can be a challenge to get out and notice nature during the colder months.  Frigid temperatures may zap motivation to get outside.  A decrease in plant life and animal activity may make it seem like there’s not much exciting going on.  Even so, getting fresh air and a dose of “Vitamin N” is important for our health.  Once you accomplish the hardest part of getting out the door, engage your senses and practice your skills of observation for “Learning to value even the most commonplace activities – and finding the teachable moments in each of them – has the potential to make the ordinary quite extraordinary” (Daniel Siegal, MD: 10 Mindful Minutes)

I hope the following prompts provides some inspiration…

Winter Buds

In late summer deciduous trees produce buds that will open the following spring.  Winter is the perfect time to take a closer look at some.  You might be amazed at the variety.  With a little practice you will be able to identify a leafless tree in winter by just its buds.

See more of our winter tree study and a list of resources here.

Winter Tracks

Winter can be a fun time to notice animal tracks.  When there’s snow on the ground, you may notice tracks that you wouldn’t otherwise.  We would never know about the opossums visiting our yard if we hadn’t seen it’s curious tracks in the snow.

If you would like to identify who made the tracks, this article has some good tips.

Resources to Inspire

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Winter Birds

As a fun family activity, try making your own bird feeders.  Peanut butter pine cone feeders and bird seed cookies are good choices for young ones to make for feathered friends.  Another  wonderful option is decorating a tree outside with feeders and edible garland.  Check out Rebecca’s post about her family’s After-Christmas tree tradition for ideas.

If you do choose to feed local birds, make a commitment to feed them all winter.  Birds need the extra calories and nutrients during this time of year when finding food can be difficult and they may come to rely on the food source you offer.

Winter Dwellings

Did you know that there are animals living in the snow during the winter?  There are hidden habitats in what’s called the subnivean zone.  You may have walked right over some without realizing it.

Why not take a cue from these snow-dwelling animals and build  your own winter fort.  Perhaps an igloo or a quinzee.  If there’s no snow, maybe a lean-to covered with branches and dead leaves.  My kids like to create habitats in the snow for some of their toy animals too.  It’s a great winter activity that utilizes creativity and problem-solving skills.

Resources to Inspire

Download and print your copy of the January prompts here.   Pin it up where you can easily see it for when you and your children need a little extra nudge to get outside and notice nature.

Have a wonder-filled week!

Fondly,
Monique

NOTICING NATURE 2017: 52 weekly prompts to inspire deeper personal connections with nature

Noticing Nature 2017: 52 weeks of prompts to inspire deeper personal connections with nature

A very happy New Year to you!  I hope that you are entering 2017 with optimism for the possibilities that lay ahead.

While I don’t make New Year resolutions I do feel a renewed energy and a restored clarity after the holidays – a great time to move ahead more mindfully and with stronger intention.

One thing I’ve been wanting to do is share nature experiences with you in a more personal way.  With this in mind I have created a private Facebook group called Noticing Nature 2017.  Every week I will share one word to serve as a prompt for noticing nature as you go about your days.  My hope is that you and your children will find inspiration for deeper personal connections with nature throughout the year.   My hope is that it will be a supportive community for people on the shared  journey of seeking a greater appreciation for nature and our place in it.  I hope you will join me there.

Noticing Nature 2017

Fondly,
Monique

Happy Holidays!

Happy Holidays! 2016

I can hardly believe that Christmas is tomorrow!

My family and I have been enjoying time together baking, wrapping, watching Christmas movies and putting final touches on home-made gifts.  The kids are also enjoying playing outside in the fresh coat of snow.  They finally got the head on their eight-foot snowman.  Now to dress him (or her) up…

I hope you have been enjoying some special time with your loved ones and that your holidays will be filled with love, laughter and good health.  For you I wish peace, wonderment, and an abundance of all that fills your heart!

I’m looking forward to the new year with you.

Fondly,

Monique

Nature Word of the Month, December 2016: HYEMATION

Nature Word of the Month, December 2016: HYEMATION

It may not say so on the calendar but winter has certainly arrived here in Maine.  The temperatures have dropped, there’s snow on the ground, and animal activity has decreased significantly.

Being a New Englander, I enjoy experiencing four seasons and the changes that come with each.  I can’t imagine my life without it.  Being someone with Raynaud’s, I don’t tolerate the cold very well (less and less as I get older).  I must admit, the last couple of years I have fantasized about wintering in Aruba.  Perhaps this is the subconscious reason I chose this month’s nature word.  I may someday join the flocks of Mainers who head to Florida for their hyemation.  Given this year’s forecast I might start now.

While this is not a common word, it is a fun one.  Can you think of how else you might apply this word to the natural world?   What or who prepares for hyemation and how?  I’ll give you one hint – think trees.

Download and print a copy here.  Hang it on your fridge, pin it to your corkboard, paste it in your nature journal or commonplace book.  Visit me on Facebook or leave a comment here about the uses you have come up with.

Have a wonder-filled weekend!

Fondly,

Monique & Family