A Complete Guide to Solar Eclipse 2017 ☀️: All the must-have resources

A Complete Guide to Solar Eclipse 2017 ☀️: All the must-have resources

Whether you are in the path of totality or not, the upcoming solar eclipse is a big deal and cause for excitement. The last time a total solar eclipse swept the whole width of the U.S. was in 1918 and this is the first solar eclipse exclusive to the U.S. since before the nation’s founding.

There’s still time to do some activities and plan where and how you are going to view the eclipse. The following resources should help. And if you won’t be able to see it, check out the interactive simulators or watch a live broadcast. We have our glasses on hand and some activities printed and prepped!

About this eclipse

Types of solar eclipses

Activity guides

Interactive Simulations

Crafts & Activities

Books

Enjoy!

Fondly,
Monique

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Wednesday Walks: Staying close to home

Wednesday Walks - Close to Home

My goodness, it has been a while since I have shared one of our weekly walks! I’ve missed sharing nature with you.

On this day we headed out for an after dinner stroll through our neighborhood. We wanted to stretch our legs and enjoy the pleasant summer evening. All the lovely, interesting things we noticed in nature was an added perk.

Before I share what we noticed though, let’s talk about the benefits of this simple activity…

  • It’s good for your soul – Going for a walk will get you away from distractions so you can spend quality time with your loved ones. Or maybe some quality time with yourself.
  • It’s good for your mind – Taking an outdoor stroll reduces stress, promotes creativity and improves concentration & memory.
  • It’s good for your body – Walking helps aid digestion, lower blood sugar levels and blood pressure. A walk outside helps fill your vitamin D needs, increases oxygen intake and can even improve eyesight.
  • Being outside is just plain good for you, whatever your age!

Now on to all the nature goodness!

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There were so many Queen Anne’s Lace in bloom. It can be found blooming at all different stages simultaneously so you really get see what it looks like in each phase. Each one is beautiful!

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This is the time of year that net-winged beetles seem to be out in multitude. We’ve been noticing them everywhere lately.

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We noticed some ferns unfurling and Alder cones just developing.

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There is a small area abutting some woods that had been cleared fairly recently. Nature, of course, is already filling back in. We saw lots of Spreading Dogbane taking over – a plant we haven’t noticed in this area before.

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We found this Robin’s nest that had been blown out of a tree. Its base was quite large and heavy with dry mud and there were some lichen bits woven into it.

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Nearing home my son stopped to listen more closely to a rustling he heard in the leaf litter. Based on it movement, we’re thinking a little vole was under there.

What we thought was going to be a simple walk turned into a rich, nature-packed experience that invigorated all of our senses. It was such a treat!

In every walk with nature one receives far more than he seeks.
-John Muir

What have you been noticing on your walks lately? If you’d like one of your walks featured here on the blog, let’s chat. I’d love for us all to share our nature finds!

Fondly,
Monique

P.S. If you would like to join a welcoming, supportive group where you will find inspiration for deeper personal connections with nature throughout the year, join me at my private FB group – Noticing Nature 2017. I’d love to see you there!

Wednesday Walks: Cathance River Nature Preserve

Wednesday Walks: Cathance River Nature Preserve

This week we head to a nature preserve along a river less than a 10 minute drive from our house. It’s one of our favorite places to visit. Early on this sunny and very warm morning we joined the local Audubon chapter for a guided bird walk.

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

It was a fairly quiet bird morning with the highlights being a Rose-breasted Grosbeak sighting, hearing the beautiful, almost haunting songs of Hermit thrushes (we stood in silent awe for quite sometime while the rest of the group continued on) and seeing a Hermit Thrush nest. They nest on the ground and this recently constructed one had been abandoned after a hard rain matted down the ferns that were providing cover.

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

It’s always a thrill to get to the river and witness its energy and power and beauty. On the walk in a Snowshoe Hare crossed our path and sat long enough for us to snap a photo. On the way out a young member of the group spied a Red-spotted Newt in a puddle on the trail. Very fun sightings!

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

During this walk we also noticed and took time to appreciate the variety of wild flowers in bloom. There are still plenty of star flowers and bunch berries blooming and so many lovely ferns adding to the lush atmosphere of the late spring woods. We also saw a Pink Lady Slipper in its white form for the very first time. We had read about this phenomenon just the day before so it was quite the coincidence!

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

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We also noticed two new-to-us flowers that I’m sure we have passed many many times. The first is Clintonia, a shade loving member of the lily family. Later in the summer they will develop brilliant blue berries which is where the common name of Blue Bead lily comes from.  I have read that the leaves were used by the Algonquin and Chippewa as an antiseptic poultice applied to wounds, infections, and burns and that Chippewa children liked to make designs in the leaves with their teeth.  These plants take about twelve years  for these lilies to flower so I know these have been here for a while.

The second is a Painted Trillium.  These flowers have a wavy margin and reddish splotches at the base of each petal which serves as a pollinator guide.  These flowers look so delicate and indeed in some areas they truly are.  Know your state conservation laws.  In some areas these plants are protected as they are in decline due to habitat destruction.

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

It was a gorgeous morning and we left with our hearts and minds full of appreciation for the amazing nature that surround us. 💚

Thanks for coming along!

P.S.  I did not do a blog post about last week’s walk but you can find it on my Instagram account.

Fondly,
Monique

Noticing Nature – Nature Prompts: June 2017

Noticing Nature - Nature Prompts for Children and Their Families_ June 2017

Each month here at Green Acorns you can find simple prompts to encourage you and your child to find your unique connection with nature.  They could be done while on a hike, right in your backyard, and even amidst the busyness of everyday life.
Taking the time to notice nature builds on your child’s natural curiosity and nurtures a sense of awe and wonder.  It provides unlimited opportunities for further exploration and cultivates an attitude of inquiry.  Personal connections with nature get woven in to one’s sense of place and can lead to stewardship of the natural world.  The list of benefits goes on an on…  And this all can be accomplished in little time with only a little effort.
You’ll find the link to download this month’s prompts at the end of the post.

Nature prompts for children and their families - July 2016

Listen

The variety of sounds in the environment and how sounds effect the way we experience natural settings often go unnoticed. Take time to slow down and tune in to your sense of hearing.

Find a comfortable sit spot in nature, have a seat and close your eyes. Listen carefully. Notice all the sounds around you. Record at least five in your journal. Don’t forget to include where you were sitting, the time of day, and the weather.

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Smell

Although we are primarily visual creatures, smell is quite a powerful sense for us.  Some scientists estimate that we can detect at least 1 trillion different smells and that our connection to certain scents begins in utero.  Because of our brain anatomy, sense of smell is strongly linked to emotions and memory.  It can also help us navigate the physical environment.

Strengthen your sense of smell by taking some mindful breaks to notice the scents around you.  Whether you stop to smell some flowers, notice the briny scent of low tide while at the beach, or while out for a walk get a sudden whiff of a new scent carried by the breeze, pause and take it in.

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Touch

So much information about the outside world can be learned through our sense of touch, which most children are naturally compelled to do.  We’re putting a fun twist on this prompt and going bareFoot!

There has been much research in recent years about the benefits of letting children go barefoot and there’s even a book about it.  Our goal is to focus on the sense of freedom and the sensory stimulation it provides.  It’s also one more way to feel more closely connected to nature.  So go for it… Free your feet and explore at least three natural surfaces (sand, grass, smooth rocks, puddles, etc). How does it feel? Soft? Prickly? Tickly? Warm? Rough? Record everything you felt and noticed in your nature journal.

P.S. International mud day  is June 29th.  Try stomping in mud puddles barefoot to celebrate.

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Observe & Move

With this prompt, children can imagine taking on the qualities of animals in the natural environment and in doing so, deepen their connection to it.

Spend some time observing a few different animals (bee, frog, squirrel, bird, etc). How do they move? Are they fast or slow? What parts of their body moves when they make a sound? How do they position their bodies at rest? What are they busy doing?

Now use your whole body to move like each animal. Record what you noticed in your journal.

Download a printable version of the prompts here.  Enjoy!

Fondly,
Monique

P.S. If you’d like to join an friendly, supportive group where you will find weekly inspiration for deeper personal connections with nature throughout the year, join me over at Noticing Nature 2017. And feel free to invite some friends.

Wednesday Walks: Evergreen Cemetery

Wednesday Walks - Evergreen Cemetery

Some time ago an Instagram follower and friend said that she’d love to go on a walk with my family because we see so many interesting things.  That was such a compliment to me and a lovely sentiment.  As I was thinking about how fun it would be to go on walks with her and with you, I had an idea – We may not be able to meet in person but we can share our walks here.  There are SO many amazing things to notice in nature and sharing with others is a wonderful way to enhance our experiences and strengthen our connections with nature and each other.

Are you ready to walk together?  Today we visit Evergreen Cemetery…

Wednesday Walks - Evergreen Cemetery

We don’t often have an agenda when we head out for a walk but today my son wanted to visit this particular location to try to find a rare bird that had been spotted a few days before.  When we arrived, my dad, youngest daughter and I spread a blanket and sat to eat lunch.  My son took off birding.  As I sat I began to take notice of the nature immediately nearby – the pink cones of a large Norway spruce, a clump of pussytoes just starting to bloom, a mallard couple cautiously checking us out, a large patch of Self-heal at the base of a tree.  I grabbed my camera and explored these sights a little.  Then it was time to join my son.

Wednesday Walks - Evergreen Cemetery

As we walked along a wooded trail my dad saw a flash of red and we all gathered for a look.  My son recognized the call and then we all saw it – a Scarlet Tanager!  Aren’t they beautiful?  I think it was just as curious about us as we were of it.  It flew closer and perched long enough for us to get a few photos.  It then flew down to a small stream to bathe.  As we stood and scanned the trees my daughter noticed a fairly large hornet nest – something we don’t come across very often.  We also began to notice other birds, like the Blue-headed Vireo pictured above, and found this sweet cup nest in a maple tree.

Wednesday Walks - Evergreen Cemetery

As we moved leisurely around the pond, senses now more alert, other things began to catch our attention.  We noticed frogs along the water’s edge holding perfectly still, maybe hoping we wouldn’t see them.  There were painted turtles gathered on a fallen tree to soak up any ray of sunshine that managed to break through the clouds and large snapping turtles thrashing about.  At first we thought they were fighting but we quickly figured it out.  It is spring after all and soon there will be a clutch of eggs.  We also spotted a Solitary Sandpiper walking in the water searching for food.

Wednesday Walks - Evergreen Cemetery

The path passes through a wooded area where there were many more birds to spot and plants that have recently emerged.  The most common spring plants we see right now in this type of habitat are field horsetails (Equisetum arvense), Canada Mayflower (Maianthemum canadense) and Trout Lilies (Erythronium americanum).  Trout Lilies do not produce flowers for the first 7-10 years of its life and spread primarily by underground runners from parent bulbs.  Because it takes so long to produce large colonies, you know when you come across one that they are quite old.  Several hundred years old.  As I stood admiring this large colony blanketing the floor of the woods I tried to image who else may have passed this way and seen the same sight.  The cemetery was constructed in 1854 and there are many civil war veterans buried here.  Would visiting loved ones 150 years ago have noticed?  Who passed this way before the cemetery was built?  Would there have been anyone harvesting the bulbs to dry for winter sustenance?  To consider the history that this area has witnessed was incredible.

Wednesday Walks - Evergreen Cemetery

So you see, the things we notice when we are outside are not things out of the ordinary.  They are things that we are surrounded by all the time.  My children and I have simply developed a habit of noticing nature which involves curiosity, enthusiasm, a sense of awe and wonder, and a focusing of attention.  And now I’m so happy to be sharing our nature walks with you.  After all, “A joy shared is a joy doubled”.  Thanks for joining us!  See you next Wednesday for another walk.

Would you like to share some sights and experiences from one of your walks?  If you are interested in having a featured ‘Wednesday Walks’ post, let’s chat!

Fondly,
Monique

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Nature Word of the Month – May 2017

Nature Word of the Month - May 2017: Frondescence

Sometimes, it can seem like we wait and wait for the arrival of spring and then all of the sudden it’s here.  Not when the calendar says it’s spring but when early spring flowers bloom by the roadsides, tree buds begin to break open, and migrating birds begin to return.

Nature word of the month - May 2017: frondescence

I was so happy to see leaves finally popping out last week, I was practically running from tree to tree to check them all out.  This week we noticed that some ferns have emerged and are starting to slowly unfurl.  I adore springtime with all the energy of renewed life in the air!  And now I am happy to have a new word to add to my nature vocabulary repertoire.  I’ll be watching closely for more spring frondescence…

If you’d like to print a copy to pin up or add to your journal, click here to download.

Fondly,
Monique

Create Poetree: 2 Nature-Based Activities for National Poetry Month

Create a Poetree: 2 Nature-Based Activities for National Poetry Month via Green Acorns

It’s National Poetry Month!  You know how I love to incorporate nature into our learning so today I have a couple of nature-based poetry activities for you and your children.

Why should our children learn about and read and write poetry?  Poetry is a wonderful form of creative self-expression.  It can be a way to connect with the world and with others and a way to process emotions.  It encourages the writer to carefully consider the use of words and the reader to consider their interpretations.  Poetry can be used to foster the skills of observation and to heighten the use of imagery.  And often, poetry has rhythm that kids can relate to.

Now on to the activities…

Grow a Poetree: Nature-Based Poetry Activities for National Poetry Month

Grow a Poetree

This activity is an open, relaxed way to create poetry.  Similar to using magnetic poetry.  Print the provided activity pages and cut out the leaves.  For young children, you may want to fill them in with words yourself and leave them out as a provocation.  My eight year old used a combination of words I filled in and words of her choosing.  I have also provided a list of words for inspiration for your child.

There is no need to have a poem already worked out when choosing the words.  That’s the fun of it!  Think about nature-related words, move the word leaves around until you like the order, and place them around your tree.  Inspired by our walk around the neighborhood earlier in the day, here is what my daughter created:

Flowers grow
Buds turn into leaves
Birds sing, Sun shining
Melting snow drips

Think about other ways you might adapt this activity for your child.  Perhaps she would like to string the word leaves onto a garland and hang it up.  It could be used to decorate some branches in a vase or even temporarily on a tree outside.  Have fun with it!

Create a Poetree: 2 Nature-Based Activities for National Poetry Month via Green Acorns

Shape a Cinquain Poetree

Cinquain is form of poetry that is composed of five lines.  The most common version we see in more modern poetry was developed by Adelaide Crapsey.  In this form each of the five lines has a set number of syllables: 2,4,6,8,2 respectfully.  There is also a framework for the number of words on each line: 1,2,3,4,1.  These patterns lend themselves well to create shape poetry.  We thought it fit perfectly with our “poetree” theme but feel free to use any shape you’d like.  Maybe a flower or a fish or anything that you’ve been noticing in nature lately.

Think about what you have been noticing in nature lately, something you enjoy doing outside, or your favorite plant, animal or outdoor location.  Or maybe there is something you saw in a book or something from your nature collection that has sparked your imagination.  Use that to inspire a topic for your poem.  Simply follow the format provided on the printable to create your own cinquain.

Here is my son’s:

Moon
Bright, Round
Shining, Waxing, Waning
Sun of night
Satellite

I hope you enjoy these poetry activities.  If you are looking for more poetry inspiration, I share some of our favorite nature-related books in this post.

Poetree Printables

Fondly,
Monique