Hitchhiking, Flying and Other Exciting Ways Seeds Travel

Hitchhiking, Flying and Other Exciting Ways Seeds Travel: a seed dispersal study with activities and free printables.

Year after year my children are captivated by the seeds that they find, especially in the fall. There are so many interesting characteristics that grab one’s attention and stimulate the imagination. They are creatively designed packages that contain precious, life-bearing gifts. Some of them even employ quite dramatic delivery methods. As we add collected seeds and pods to our nature table once again, we are revisiting our study of the different types of seeds and how they travel. I have updated the printables we use so that I can share them with you.

Hitchhiking, Flying and Other Exciting Ways Seeds Travel: a seed dispersal study with activities and free printables.

Seed dispersal is a fascinating, fun and rich topic. With the abundance of seeds around, it’s fairly easy to find some to examine. And their diversity is sure to spark some awe and wonder. I hope after doing some exploring, your child will be curious and inspired to learn more. The resources and activity printables provided will help guide his interest into meaningful experiences.

Activities & Printables

  • Start by reading about the different types of seeds (see resources provided below) and print this chart as a quick reference.

Seed Categories

  • This activity will help your child learn the different seed classifications. Cut out the images on the second page and sort them into the appropriate category (hint: The images are arranged in the correct order. You may like to print a second copy to use as reference.)

Seed Type Sort

  • After your child has collected a variety of seeds and pods, use this printable to sort them by how they get dispersed.

Dispersal Sort

  • Animals play a huge role in helping to disperse seeds. Your child can record what they have learned about the methods animals use on this sheet.

How Animals Help Seeds Travel

Hitchhiking, Flying and Other Exciting Ways Seeds Travel: a seed dispersal study with activities and free printables.

Resources to compliment your study of seed dispersal…

Read

Watch

On-line Resources

Hitchhiking, Flying and Other Exciting Ways Seeds Travel: a seed dispersal study with activities and free printables.

Happy exploring!

Fondly,
Monique

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Wednesday Walks: Cathance River Nature Preserve

Wednesday Walks: Cathance River Nature Preserve

This week we head to a nature preserve along a river less than a 10 minute drive from our house. It’s one of our favorite places to visit. Early on this sunny and very warm morning we joined the local Audubon chapter for a guided bird walk.

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

It was a fairly quiet bird morning with the highlights being a Rose-breasted Grosbeak sighting, hearing the beautiful, almost haunting songs of Hermit thrushes (we stood in silent awe for quite sometime while the rest of the group continued on) and seeing a Hermit Thrush nest. They nest on the ground and this recently constructed one had been abandoned after a hard rain matted down the ferns that were providing cover.

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

It’s always a thrill to get to the river and witness its energy and power and beauty. On the walk in a Snowshoe Hare crossed our path and sat long enough for us to snap a photo. On the way out a young member of the group spied a Red-spotted Newt in a puddle on the trail. Very fun sightings!

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

During this walk we also noticed and took time to appreciate the variety of wild flowers in bloom. There are still plenty of star flowers and bunch berries blooming and so many lovely ferns adding to the lush atmosphere of the late spring woods. We also saw a Pink Lady Slipper in its white form for the very first time. We had read about this phenomenon just the day before so it was quite the coincidence!

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

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We also noticed two new-to-us flowers that I’m sure we have passed many many times. The first is Clintonia, a shade loving member of the lily family. Later in the summer they will develop brilliant blue berries which is where the common name of Blue Bead lily comes from.  I have read that the leaves were used by the Algonquin and Chippewa as an antiseptic poultice applied to wounds, infections, and burns and that Chippewa children liked to make designs in the leaves with their teeth.  These plants take about twelve years  for these lilies to flower so I know these have been here for a while.

The second is a Painted Trillium.  These flowers have a wavy margin and reddish splotches at the base of each petal which serves as a pollinator guide.  These flowers look so delicate and indeed in some areas they truly are.  Know your state conservation laws.  In some areas these plants are protected as they are in decline due to habitat destruction.

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

Wednesday Walks (6-14-17)

It was a gorgeous morning and we left with our hearts and minds full of appreciation for the amazing nature that surround us. 💚

Thanks for coming along!

P.S.  I did not do a blog post about last week’s walk but you can find it on my Instagram account.

Fondly,
Monique

Noticing Nature – Nature Prompts: March 2017

Noticing Nature - Nature Prompts for Children and Their Families_ March 2017.jpg

Marcescent Plants

The nature word of the month is “marcescent” so your challenge is to take notice of the marcescent trees in your area.  Add some sketches of the leaves to your nature journal or take photos and display them on your nature shelf.  Don’t forget to add the date, the location you found the tree, and the type of tree (if you don’t know this would make a wonderful investigation activity).

winter shades of green

Shades of Green

Year after year my children and I are amazed at how many shades of green we notice during the winter months, even when there is a thick layer of snow covering the ground.  I shared this colors of fall color wheel as part of the October nature prompts and since it was so popular, I thought I would create one to use for a shades of green nature hunt.  How many can you match?  If you celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, going on a green nature hunt is a perfect activity to tie in to the day’s fun.

Download the Shades of Green color wheel, print it on card stock (for durability you could also laminate it or glue cut out wheel to an empty cereal box), and get hunting!

Winter Tree Bud Nature Hunt

Did you know that usually by mid-summer deciduous trees have formed their buds for the following spring?  Winter is a great time to get out and observe the variety of buds as they are easy to spot on the bare branches.  You might be amazed at the variety of shapes, sizes, colors and arrangements.

You can find some helpful resources in the ‘Identifying Winter Trees‘ post but here is some terminology to know before you head out:

Arrangement

Like the branches of a tree, its buds also grow in certain arrangements:

  • opposite –  structures (branches, buds, leaves) grow in pairs from opposite sides of the twig at the same level
  • alternate – structures grow singly from the twig without another leaf directly across the twig
  • whorled – three or more structures grow from the same level on the twig

The scales of a bud, if present, also have unique arrangements:

  • imbricate – multiple scales that overlap each other like shingles
  • valvate – 2 to 3 scales that do not overlap
  • naked – there are no scales covering the leaf bud

Shape

If you’d like to learn the specific names of the various shapes that tree buds, this is an easy to understand resource with drawings and matching photos.

Once you have reviewed this vocabulary, print off the ‘Tree Bud Bingo‘ sheet (we like to laminate ours for repeated use), grab your Bingo marker and see how many different tree buds you can spot.

winter tree bud bingo

You can build on this activity by trying this longer-term tree bud observation.

First Day of Spring Sit Spot

The first day of spring is March 20th and it’s the perfect time to (re)establish the routine of visiting a sit spot.  A sit spot is simply a special place in nature where you are comfortable sitting quietly and observing the nature around you.  It should be a spot you can access easily and regularly and have these qualities.  Right in your own backyard is a good place to start.

Once you and your child have found your special sit spots, spend some time just sitting quietly and observing.  Start with at least 5 minutes and slowly increase the time each visit.  If your child is quite young, sit with her.  Ask questions like: What sounds do you hear?   Do you notice any smells?  What’s the weather like?  Is there any animal activity?  What does the ground feel like?  What do you notice about the plants around you?  With practice, your child will become familiar with making these observations for herself.

Make sure that the sit spot is easily identifiable so that your child can return to the same spot each time.  Try to visit the spot once a month.  This will provide your child the opportunity to observe the changes that occur in nature throughout the seasons.  Through this practice, your child will feel a personal connection to the nature all around, will develop a strong sense of place and will have a sense of wonder that will be carried throughout her life.

Follow on Facebook and at Instagram to see what we notice from our sit spots on the first day of spring.

Download this month’s nature prompts here and print and hang them up where you can easily see them.  We post ours on our home-school morning board and review the prompts regularly.

Have fun noticing nature!

Fondly,
Monique